Archive for the ‘displaced’ Category

SP0021 – World Crisis “Forced Labor”

July 15, 2009

 

Forced Labor

By Juan Chamero, from Caece University at Buenos Aires, Argentine, July 12th 2009

Subject: people, Crime Organized, economy, people rights, security,  geopolitics, homeless, immigrants,  people displaced, people diseases, invisible people, massacre,  people poverty,  society, social research

 Info Source 1: ILO, International Labor Organization; ILO Forced Labor Statistics; NYT Forced Labor in China, by Howard French; A forced labor Blog;

  

forced_labor004 

Workers rescued in May from a brick kiln in Linfen, in Shanxi Province, in northern China, in what has become an unfolding labor abuse scandal, By HOWARD W. FRENCH, Published: June 16, 2007

 

 ILO Forced Labor Report

As per 12th May 2009

“….At least 12.3 million people around the world are trapped in forced labour. The ILO works to combat the practice and the conditions that give rise to it. Forced labour takes different forms, including debt bondage, trafficking and other forms of modern slavery. The victims are the most vulnerable – women and girls forced into prostitution, migrants trapped in debt bondage, and sweatshop or farm workers kept there by clearly illegal tactics and paid little or nothing. The ILO has worked since its inception to tackle forced labour and the conditions that give rise to it and has established a Special Action Programme on Forced Labour to intensify this effort. “

 Forced Labor Statistics

 Asia

Asia accounts for by far the biggest share of the world’s forced labourers. Many are migrants, either from elsewhere in Asia or their home country. The ILO currently views three issues with particular concern:

 • Persistence of bonded labour systems, particularly in South Asia, despite longstanding legislation to ban and punish such practices as well as efforts to identify, release and rehabilitate bonded labourers.

 • Widespread trafficking of children and adults, for both sexual and labour exploitation.

 • Continued use of forced labour by the State and official institutions, notably in Myanmar.

 Research has also shown the existence of forced labour in sectors that had escaped previous attention, including Thailand’s shrimp, fishing and seafood processing industries and shrimp production in Bangladesh.

 Some of the highest recruitment payments in the world are found in China, with research showing that workers can pay as much as 2.5 times their expected annual income in recruitment fees to obtain jobs in the U.S.

 Americas

Latin America accounts for the second largest number of forced labourers in the world after Asia, according to ILO estimates. Those most at risk are migrant workers in sweatshops, agriculture and domestic service. The main form of forced labour is through debt bondage, involving informal and unlicensed intermediaries who pay advances to entice workers and then reap profits through inflated charges.

 Forced labour in Latin America is closely linked to patterns of inequality and discrimination, especially against indigenous peoples. As a result, action to combat forced labour must be part of a broad framework of measures and programs aimed at reducing poverty by fighting discrimination and promoting the rights of indigenous peoples as well as helping poorest workers in urban areas.

In Argentina, there has been a crackdown against garment workshops following evidence that Bolivian men and their families were being trafficked for employment in the sector. Coercive practices include removal of identity documents, locking workers in factories and compelling them to work for up to 17 hours a day. After a factory fire killed several Bolivians in March 2006, a government inspection program led to the closure of more than half of the workshops visited. The drive included the establishment of a telephone hotline “Slave Labour Kills” in April 2006.

Elsewhere in Latin America, abusive practices include compulsory overtime, with allegations that in Guatemala, for example, workers were threatened with dismissal for refusing to work shifts of up to 24 hours.

 

 Info source 2: BBC of London, In Pictures: Forced Labor and Trafficking; David Kilgour Website a director of the Washington-based Council for a Community of Democracies (CCD).

Some not so awesome Forced Labor Images

forced_labor001 

From Russia: These are orphans. Natasha is the last one in the row, hiding from everybody. She was taken to the foster home by police who found her at a train station. Natasha didn’t know her surname or her age. Her mother is said to have sold her to people who ran a “beggar business”. “If I didn’t bring any money, they would beat me and send me back to work next morning,” she told people at the home. Natasha later disappeared from the orphanage and has not been seen since. Her mother has been located – she denies selling her daughter, saying she “rented her so she could earn some money for textbooks”.

 

 forced_labor002 

Butterflies made by Falun Gong practitioners detained in Heizuizi Women’s Labor Camp in Changchun City, Jilin Province. The above pictures are some products and children’s jewelry made by Falun Gong practitioners under duress in the Masanjia Forced Labor Camp in Shenyang City, Liaoning Province. In addition to persecuting practitioners using brutal torture, murder, and sexual abuse, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) also uses forced labor and organ harvesting to make huge profits. Falun Gong practitioners are illegally arrested and sent to prisons, labor camps, and brainwashing centers just for remaining steadfast in their belief in Falun Dafa and the principles of Truthfulness, Compassion and Forbearance. While they are subjected to physical mistreatment, they also have to do hard labor for over 10 hours a day in very poor working conditions to make products. These products are exported to the United States, Japan, Australia, Europe, and have brought in a huge amount of foreign currency for the CCP. The economic exploitation of practitioners is an important part of the persecution of Falun Dafa by the CCP.

 

 Comments: These two pills show us the remaining of an almost chronic social disease: slavery. Take into account that ILO statistics talk of about 13 millions of people suffering the cruelest forms of forced labor. However this is only the visible part of the people exploitation iceberg: people who are enforced to work more than 16 hours a day six days a week and living like animals. People working in Latin American “maquilas” and sweatshops working from 11 hours a day up whole weeks all over the world should be accounted for hundreds of millions. 

Tags: ILO, International Labor Organization, forced labor, forced labour, debt bondage, trafficking, modern slavery, slavery, sweatshops, sweatshop, Howard French, forced labor in China, garment workshops, slave labor kills, Myanmar slavery, Thailand shrimp, Bangladesh slavery, migrant workers, indigenous people slavery, Argentina garment shops, Argentina garment factories, bolivian urban slavery, slave labor kills, slave labour kills, compulsory overtime, continuous shifts, Davod Kilgour, beggar business, russian beggar business, Falun Gong, Falun Gong slavery, Masanjia Forced Labor Camp, Masanjia, Shenyang City, organ harvesting, Chinese organ harvesting,

Advertisements

SP0014 – World Crisis “Invisible Citizens”

April 26, 2009

 

Invisible People – Invisible Children

By Juan Chamero, from Caece University at Buenos Aires, Argentine, April 25th 2009

 

 

birthregistationnn_children

Source: UNICEF

 

Subject: nationality, birth registration, non person

Info Source 1: Child Birth Registration, from Childinfo.org of UNICEF, July 2008

A name and a nationality are human rights

Article 7 of the CRC gives every child the right to be registered at birth by the state within whose jurisdiction the child is born. This means that states must make birth registration accessible and available to all children including asylum seekers, refugees and immigrants.

 Drawing from the right to a name and nationality contained in this article 7, the 2002 General Assembly Resolution ‘A World Fit for Children‘ reaffirms governments’ commitment to ensure the birth registration of all children and to invest in educate and protect children from harm and exploitation. In order to achieve these goals, it is necessary for governments to have accurate population data in order to plan services provision for children and their caregivers.

 During the 1990s, there was growing awareness of the importance of prompt birth registration as an essential means of protecting a child’s right to identity, as well as respect for other children’s rights. The lack of a birth certificate may prevent a child from receiving health care, nutritional supplements and social assistance, and from being enrolled in school. Later in childhood, identity documents help protect children against early marriage, child labor, premature enlistment in the armed forces or, if accused of a crime, prosecution as an adult.

Infor source 2: Fact Sheets – Birth Registration, from UNICEF, April 25th 2009

The right to a name and nationality is well established. However, in 2000 alone, some 50 million births went unregistered – over 40 per cent of all estimated births worldwide that year. These unregistered children are almost always from poor, marginalized or displaced families or from countries where systems of registration are not in place or functional.

Globally, South Asia has the largest number of unregistered children, with approximately 22.5 million, or over 40 per cent of the world’s unregistered births in 2000. In sub-Saharan Africa, 70 per cent of all births went unregistered in 2000. In South Asia, the figure was 63 per cent. In the Middle East and North Africa, nearly one third of the children born in 2000 were unregistered, while in East Asia and the Pacific, 22 per cent of births were not registered.

Info Source 3: The invisible children, report from Invisiblechildren.org, one recent and randomly selected, April 25th 2009

THE RESCUE
The Lords Resistance Army’s violent tactics have devastated the populations of four nations in east and central Africa; we now have the opportunity to stand in solidarity with the affected populations and urge for action from the international community to protect innocent civilians and rescue children senselessly involved with this war. Join us April 25th in 100 cities in 9 nations for
The Rescue.

Info source 4: statelessness people status ó NN, from Wikipedia

Statelessness is the legal and social concept of a person lacking belonging (or a legally enforceable claim) to any recognised state. Statelessness is not always the same as lack of citizenship.

De jure statelessness is where there exists no recognised state in respect of which the subject has a legally meritorious basis to claim nationality.

De facto statelessness is where the subject may have a legally meritorious claim but is precluded from asserting it because of practical considerations such as cost, circumstances of civil disorder, or the fear of persecution.

Comment: By undocumented people common people and media mean somehow illegal immigrants, refugees, gypsies, perhaps keeping our mind save. Unfortunately most invisible people are “native” children born in existent countries and many of them potentially leading the world development.

Categories: people, invisible people, establishment. people rights

Tags: invisible people, NN, invisible children, statelessness, statelessness people, gypsies, refugees, war children, De facto statelessness, De jure statelessness, UNICEF, China, India, Chindia, child birth registration, CBR, CRC, Beijing, citizens, citizenship, non person,

SP0012 – World Crisis “The Future of Work”

April 24, 2009

 

The Future of Work – A Corporate Vision

By Juan Chamero, from Caece University at Buenos Aires, Argentine, April 22th 2009

 

futureofwork_businessweek1

 

Source: Business Week, August 20th 2007

Subject: The future of work, labor utopias, labor trends

Info source 1: BW, Business Week Series about “The Future of Work” – 2007, 2008, 2009,…-, a sample of selected articles about labor trends all over the world: a corporate vision.

The Future of Work – The problem and the promise on the road ahead

BusinessWeek.com’s editor-in-chief, John Byrne, talks with chief economist Michael Mandel about how we will master technology, manage companies, and build careers in the world of tomorrow

And as an example of this “vision”:

What Good are Economists Anyway? – Is their help still crucial to a recovery?

Economists mostly failed to predict the worst economic crisis since the 1930s. Now, they can’t agree how to solve it. People are starting to wonder whether they can really help

 

Info source 2: The Future of Work as per TheFutureOfWork,net: A “Big Ones” corporative vision about the “future of the workforce”

We help organizations reduce their cost of operations and workforce support by 40% or more while creating work environments that attract and retain the best and brightest talent – by providing strategic guidance, change readiness assessments, executive learning, and program management.

WDC has three primary capabilities, all focused on creating productive work environments and enhancing organizational effectiveness:

1.     Developing Knowledge

2.     Improving bottom-line performance

3.     Building new workplaces

WDC, stands for Work Design Collaborative intiative

 

Comment: These articles resemble arguments used by Big Corporations when justifying their sustained development policies violations. From Plato to Marx we human need to work (see our next entries about Utopias).

 Categories: establishment, corporate establishment, people, people displaced

Tags: the future of work, new work places, workforce, corporate workforce, labor utopias, labor trends.